Looking at BREXIT in a historical context

The view from a former EU official

See here the text of an informal luncheon address by my friend Michael Graham, former EU official currently living in Beijing, looking at BREXIT in a historical context.
It was addressed in Beijing at a Chinese-American group on 6 March 2017.

The title:
BREXIT AND ITS CONSEQUENCES
PERCEPTIONS AND OUTLOOK IN THE UK AND IN EUROPE
Download here: 170306 Brexitspeechrev3

EU and Brexit

The well researched document gives a unique insight and provides historical data on how the EU was set up and evolved over the years, how the complex interactions between the UK and the rest of the EU changed, how it led to Brexit, and how it could affect the Brexit negotiations. It also explains the underlying causes that lead to the Brexit vote.

No Dunkirk Spirit Can Save Britain From Brexit Defeat
The following article from the New York Times gives a rather sober/somber outlook on what Brexit could mean for the UK: https://www.nytimes.com/2017/07/28/opinion/dunkirk-christopher-nolan-brexit.html

See here two quotes:

A senior ex-diplomat, a man who has spent a professional lifetime building up Britain’s trade and its credibility with investors, is aghast at what the Brexit chaos is doing to our reputation. “The core narrative of the country for the past 40 years has been that we’re stable and politically predictable; the ideal platform for investing into the single market,” he told me. “And now we’re rudderless and in a mess.”

Britain is not an economic powerhouse waiting to be liberated. We are a country of mediocre education and limited skills, whose preening vanity has prevented us from seeing our failings. Our membership in the European Union is not a set of restraints; it is what has been propping us up. If we insist on cutting ourselves off, parts of our economy will start to die.

Does not sound encouraging…

Speaking to Dutch, US and UK MBA

Wagner Executive MBA Sport Management (The Netherlands)

Speaking to Dutch, US and UK MBA this year, see here first our Dutch group. The MBA group visits China about twice a year.
Twelve participants from the Wagner Executive MBA Sport Management – sports managers, led by Prof. drs. Philip Wagner.
As usual, seminar done in Duge Boutique Hotel, on Friday 17 March 2017, duration of about two hours including Q&A.
Theme: A(nother) view on China – Sport in China – China’s challenges

Westfield University

Westfield University (Massachusetts, USA). Group of 15 undergraduate students (International Business) with two professors.
Duration: well over 2 hours with a lively Q&A.
Organized by The China Guide, in the VIP room of Legend Beer (Gongti Xi Lu) on 1 June 2017.
Theme: A(nother) view on China – China’s challenges

Cass Business School (London)

Cass is a regular, usually visiting in summer. On Friday 14 July I talked to a group of about fifty EMBAs, in the Regent Beijing Hotel (Jinbao Street). Duration: about two hours including Q&A.
Organized by Legacy Ventures London, see www.legacy-ventures.com. We work together since many years.
Group led by Dr. Alessandro Giudici, Lecturer in Management, Cass Business School.
Theme: A(nother) view on China – China’s challenges

Along the usual introduction on China, also this:
How is policy formed in China? How are government policies created and which stakeholders are more likely to be involved in its creation? To which stakeholders is the government more likely to be “sensitive”? The underlying big questions: how predictable are Chinese policies and Chinese policy shifts? What direction are they likely to take?
I was lucky that day for two reasons: I managed to go and return without the forecast of thunderstorms. And being so early I had the time to solve an unexpected problem: I did not have a connector for HDMI… The hotel did solve it!

Supporting Daniel Albrecht for vice president EUCCC

Why Daniel?

All candidates up for election in the European Chamber of Commerce in China are capable and merit our vote. I am supporting Daniel Albrecht for vice president EUCCC simply because he stands up to do more for SMEs, an often neglected crowd in the Chamber and in top-level meetings. Mats Harborn is another strong candidate.
See here all candidates:
http://agm.europeanchamber.com.cn/beijing/#candidates

See his video:

Motivation Letter

See: MOTIVATION_LETTER_DANIEL_ALBRECHT

After being an active member in the EUCCC since 2014 I decided to run for the position of Vice President of the European Chamber of Commerce in China (EUCCC).
This is the first time I run for a position on the Board of the EUCCC. I see this as a chance to bring fresh ideas and new energy into the chamber as a board member.
Through my professional experience in Beijing I have become familiar with problems affecting European SMEs such as general legal issues as well as IPR matters. As a small company I have encountered also the difficulties of working in China, being very different from issues faced by multinationals. For SMEs it is more difficult to get support from officials or other institutions due to a lack of a proper lobbying. My clients have been based in several European countries so I am familiar with their different needs and requirements.
I have more than ten years of China experience. In the past I worked for different Chinese and foreign law firms. I have been a member of the EUCCC since 2014, being active in the SME, IPR and CSR Working Groups. Since 2016 I have been helping the China SME IPR Help Desk as an external expert.
In my work for the Chamber, I have devoted myself to write comments and articles for the position papers and other publications and to try to contribute substantial input to change national regulations.
As a Vice president and advocate of the European SMEs I will focus on:

  • Strengthen the voice of European SMEs in China
  • Implement a nationwide network to defend the interests of the SMEs
  • Contribute to the effectiveness of our Chamber
  • Promote a strong European identify of the Chamber
  • Involve more European members

Biography

Daniel Albrecht, German attorney at law, married with a Chinese wife and has a 14-year -old daughter. As an attorney for more than ten years, he is a trusted lawyer of several embassies. Daniel used to be the founder, as well as a lawyer of DA-Legal, after practicing law in Germany, Japan and China, now he is running his own company, Starke, in China since 2014. With more than ten years’ experience in law area, especially in Chinese Law, he also acts as the external expert of EU China IPR SME Help Desk since 2016.  Daniel has not only lots of work experience but also a number of academic experience in Law Field. Having experience as an invited lecturer in universities in Germany, he is now a guest professor of Civil Law of China University of Political Science and Law (CUPL) since 2016. During his career in law, he has published several articles aiming e-commerce, IPR and other law issues in Chinese, Japanese and German magazines.
Daniel also devotes himself to voluntary works. He had been the president of the China-German-Business-Network since 2009 to 2016. From 2015 to 2016, he was the president of the Rotary Club of Beijing. Daniel is also active in different chambers of commerce in China, of which related mostly to SME topics and activities. He always has enthusiasm for organization works and willing to exert efforts.

In China anything can be copied

IPR anybody?

As reported earlier, IPR is a major problem as In China anything can be copied.
Some copies can be hilarious but some other copies are rather bad for your health.

Some examples

Fake rice, yes that exists as well as fake eggs. There was a hoopla in Nigeria about imports (from China, what else?) said to be fake rice. Then the authorities got fuzzy and confused about it. Maybe they ate the rice?
Geely tried to copy Rolls Royce. Nice try.
Pollution masks had a really familiar logo. Maybe with a smell of beer? Healthy Heineken!
Cosmetics can be pretty tricky, there are so many fakes on the market. Mostly they show their true face by the spelling mistakes. Lancôme suddenly becomes Lancômes. Problem is, 99% of the Chinese hardly can read any English and are easily fooled. Pretty dangerous to use those products as one has no idea what’s inside.

Death By China: really?

The new Trump team

“Death By China” is again in the news. Sino-US trade frictions loom with Trump’s new pick for policy adviser, as explained in the SCMP:
Appointment of China critic Peter Navarro points to more bilateral tensions ahead, analyst says.
22 December 2016,
http://www.scmp.com/news/china/diplomacy-defence/article/2056678/sino-us-trade-frictions-loom-trumps-new-pick-policy

Peter Navarro

The professor is the author of “Death By China: How America Lost Its Manufacturing Base” (2011)
See the Official Version  of the documentary (in China you need VPN):

I did watch the entire documentary and can only say it is pretty harsh on China and at least a part of his statements are simply dead wrong, e.g. his take on Apple and Foxconn.
However he could find some supporters in the foreign business community for some of his criticism. Anyway Chinese officials better not simply dismiss the whole thing but instead have a close look.

More from Navarro

Peter Navarro is a professor at the Merage School of Business at the University of California-Irvine. With a Masters of Public Administration from the Kennedy School of Government and a Ph.D. in economics from Harvard, this distinguished macroeconomist has written extensively on Asia as well as lived and worked there.

crouchingtiger

His other book: “Crouching Tiger: What China’s Militarism Means for the World” (2015)
See: http://crouchingtiger.net/

It says there:
Will there be war with China? The Crouching Tiger book provides the most complete and accurate assessment of the probability of conflict between the United States and the rising Asian superpower. Equally important, it lays out an in-depth analysis of the possible pathways to peace. Written like a geopolitical detective story, the narrative encourages reader interaction by starting each chapter with an intriguing question that often challenge conventional wisdom. Based on interviews with more than thirty top experts, the author highlights a number of disturbing facts about China’s recent military buildup and the shifting balance of power in Asia: the Chinese are deploying game-changing “carrier killer” ballistic missiles; some of America’s supposed allies in Europe and Asia are selling highly lethal weapons systems to China in a perverse twist on globalization; and, on the U.S. side, debilitating cutbacks in the military budget send a message to the world that America is not serious about its “pivot to Asia.”

And so on.
Oh well, not planning to buy his book(s). Let’s see what he will really do. And good luck to him. He will need it.